Feb 27, 2024  
2022-2023 College Catalog 
    
2022-2023 College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses of Instruction


The following courses are offered at MGCCC. Courses are identified by name and number.  Those numbered from 1001 to 1999 are considered freshman level courses, and those from 2001 to 2999 are sophomore level courses. 

The three numbers in parentheses after the description of each academic and technical course indicate the number of semester hour credits for the course, the number of lecture hours each week, and the number of laboratory or activity hours each week, respectively. Instructional hours are indicated for career and technical courses.

 

Heavy Equipment Maintenance (DET)

  
  • DET 1513 - Hydraulics I


    Credit(s): 3

    This is a course designed to provide knowledge of basic operation and maintenance of hydraulic systems associated with diesel powered equipment, includes instruction in safety, system components, operation, and repair. (3,1,4)
  
  • DET 1613 - Preventive Maintenance and Service


    Credit(s): 3

    This is a course designed to provide practice in the preventive maintenance of diesel-powered equipment, includes instruction in general preventive maintenance of vehicles and equipment. (3,1,4)
  
  • DET 1713 - Air Conditioning and Heating Systems


    Credit(s): 3

    This is a course designed to provide diagnosis, service, maintenance, and repair of power train units on transportation equipment, includes instruction on clutch, manual transmissions, drive shafts, and drive axles. (3,2,2)
  
  • DET 1813 - Air Conditioning and Heating Systems


    Credit(s): 3

    This is a course designed to provide skills and knowledge related to the operation, maintenance, and repair of air conditioning and heating systems used in commercial equipment, includes instruction in theories and operating principles, A/C system diagnosis and repair, clutch and compressor repair, evaporator and condenser repair, and heating system repair. (3,1,4)
  
  • DET 2273 - Electrical/Electronic Systems III


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is designed to provide advanced skills and knowledge associated with the diagnosis, service, and repair of electrical and electronic systems on diesel engines, includes instruction in electronic fuel management systems. (3,1,4)
  
  • DET 2383 - Diesel Systems III - Compare to Preventive


    Credit(s): 3

    A basic course to provide students with an opportunity to diagnosis, service, and repair of general engine operations and fuel system operations. (3,2,2)
  
  • DET 2513 - Hydraulic/Hydrostats II


    Credit(s): 3

    This is a course designed to provide diagnosis and repair of hydraulic brake systems, includes instruction in hydraulic and mechanical systems, power assist units, and antilock braking systems. (3,2,2)
  
  • DET 2523 - Heavy Equipment Power Trains


    Credit(s): 3

    A basic course to provide students with maintenance and repair of fluid power and hydrostat transmissions used on heavy equipment to include operation and diagnosis and repair of system components. (3,1,4)
  
  • DET 2623 - Advanced Brake Systems (Air)


    Credit(s): 3

    A basic course to provide students with instruction and practice in the maintenance and repair of air brake systems commonly used on commercial diesel powered transportation and heavy equipment, includes instruction in maintenance and repair of the air supply system, mechanical system, antilock braking system, and traction control system. (3,2,2)

Dietary Nutritional Practicum (DNP)

  
  • DNP 2113 - Dietary/Nutritional Practicum I


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is designed for Dietary/Nutritional majors as a pre-professional field experience to broaden the student’s public knowledge and expand the dietary and nutritional principles and experience necessary to apply the theory and content learned throughout the coursework. It is expected that the field experience will afford students the opportunity to interact and collaborate with nutritional professionals and organizations with similar missions. Integral to closing the loop on the learning process is the opportunity for students to reflect on the field experience. Students will collaborate on the different infrastructures and approaches they observed at each field location. Consent of the Dietary/Nutritional Navigator program director required. Eight hours clinic per week. Pre/corequisites: Admission into a PHT/Navigator Concentration. PHT courses must be taken in curriculum display.  (3,0,9)

     

  
  • DNP 2223 - Dietary/Nutritional Practicum II


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is designed for Dietary/Nutritional majors as a pre-professional field experience to broaden the student’s public knowledge and expand the dietary and nutritional principles and experience necessary to apply the theory and content learned throughout the coursework. It is expected that field experience II will continue to afford students the opportunity to interact and collaborate with nutritional professionals and organizations with similar missions. Integral to closing the loop on the learning process is the opportunity for students to reflect on the field experience. Students will collaborate on the different infrastructures and approaches they observed at each field location. Consent of the Dietary/Nutritional Navigator program director required. Eight hours clinic per week. Pre/corequisites: Admission into a PHT/Navigator Concentration. PHT courses must be taken in curriculum display.  (3,0,9)

     


Commercial Truck Driving (DTV)

  
  • DTV 1116 - Commercial Truck Driving I


    Credit(s): 6

    Fundamental instruction on safety, rules and regulations, driving practices, air brakes, hazardous materials, and emergencies. Includes instruction and practice in performing vehicle inspections, coupling and uncoupling, maneuvering, backing, and driving a tractor-trailer truck under varying road and climate conditions. (6,1,10)
  
  • DTV 1126 - Commercial Truck Driving II


    Credit(s): 6

    Continuation of Commercial Truck Driving I with additional instruction on safety, rules and regulations, driving practices, air brakes, hazardous materials, and emergencies. Includes instruction and practice in performing vehicle inspections, coupling and uncoupling, maneuvering, backing, and driving a tractor-trailer truck under varying road and climate conditions. (6,1,10)

Economics (ECO)

  
  • ECO 2113 - Principles of Macroeconomics


    Credit(s): 3

    The study of a nation’s economy to include the following topics: supply and demand, production possibilities, monetary and fiscal policies, factors of production, GDP/business cycles and economic growth, circular flow of market economies. (3,3,0)
  
  • ECO 2123 - Principles of Microeconomics


    Credit(s): 3

    The study of firms, industries and consumers to include the following topics: supply and demand, elasticity of demand and supply, consumer choice theory, production and cost theory and market structures. (3,3,0)

Electronics (EET)

  
  • EET 1114 - DC Circuits


    Credit(s): 4

    Principles and theories associated with DC circuits. This course includes the study of electrical circuits, laws and formulae, and the use of test equipment to analyze DC circuits. (4,2,4)
  
  • EET 1123 - AC Circuits


    Credit(s): 3

    Principles and theories associated with AC circuits. This course includes the study of electrical circuits, laws and formulae, and the use of test equipment to analyze AC circuits. Principles and theories associated with DC circuits. This course includes the study of electrical circuits, laws and formulae, and the use of test equipment to analyze DC circuits. Prerequisites: EET 1114 . (3,2,2)
  
  • EET 1174 - Fluid Power


    Credit(s): 4

    This basic course provides instruction in hydraulics and pneumatics.  The course covers actuators, accumulators, valves, pumps, motors, coolers, compression of air, control devices, and circuit diagrams.  Emphasis is placed on the development of control circuits and troubleshooting techniques.  (4,3,2)
  
  • EET 1214 - Digital Electronics


    Credit(s): 4

    Number systems, logic circuits, counters, registers, memory devices, combination logic circuits, Boolean algebra, and a basic computer system (4,3,2)
  
  • EET 1334 - Solid State Devices and Circuits


    Credit(s): 4

    Active devices that include PN junction diodes, bipolar transistors, bipolar transistor circuits, and unipolar devices with emphasis on low-frequency application and troubleshooting. Pre/corequisites: EET 1123 , EET 1114 . (4,2,4)
  
  • EET 1343 - Motor Control Systems


    Credit(s): 3

    This course covers installation of different motor control circuits and devices.  Emphasis is placed on developing the student’s ability to diagram, wire, and troubleshoot the different circuits and mechanical control devices. (3,2,2)
  
  • EET 1613 - Computer Fundamentals for Electronics/Electricity


    Credit(s): 3

    Basic computer science as used in electricity/electronics areas. Computer nomenclature, logic, numbering systems, coding, and operating system commands are covered. (3,2,2)
  
  • EET 1713 - Drafting for Electronics Technology


    Credit(s): 3

    Preparation and interpretation of schematics, block diagrams, flow charts, and PCB prototyping. (3,1,4)
  
  • EET 2334 - Linear Integrated Circuits


    Credit(s): 4

    Advanced semiconductor devices and linear integrated circuits. Emphasis is placed on linear integrated circuits used with operational amplifiers, active filters, voltage regulators, timers, and phase-locked loops. Prerequisite: EET 1334 . (4,3,2)
  
  • EET 2354 - Solid State Motor Control


    Credit(s): 4

    The course covers the principles and operation of solid-state motor control as well as the design, installation, and maintenance of different solid-state devices for motor control. (4,2,4)
  
  • EET 2363 - Programmable Logic Controllers


    Credit(s): 3

    This course covers the use of programmable logic controllers (PLCs) in modern industrial settings as well as the operating principles of PLCs and practice in the programming, installation, and maintenance of PLCs. (3,1,4)
  
  • EET 2364 - Programmable Logic Controllers


    Credit(s): 4

    This course covers use of programmable logic controllers (PLCs) in modern industrial settings as well as the operating principles of PLCs and practice in the programming, installation, and maintenance of PLCs. (4,2,4)
  
  • EET 2414 - Electronic Communications


    Credit(s): 4

    This course is designed to provide the student with concepts and skills related to analog and digital communications. Topics covered include amplitude and frequency modulation, transmission, and reception; data transmission formats and codes; and modulation demodulation of digital communications. Prerequisite: EET 1334 . (4,2,4)
  
  • EET 2423 - Fundamentals of Fiber Optics


    Credit(s): 3

    Fiber-optic cable in modern industry applications. Corequisite: EET 2334 . (3,2,2)
  
  • EET 2514 - Interfacing Techniques


    Credit(s): 4

    Data acquisition devices and systems including their interface to microprocessors and other control systems. (4,2,4)
  
  • EET 2913 - Special Project


    Credit(s): 3

    Practical application of skills and knowledge gained in other technical courses. The instructor works closely with the student to ensure that the selection of a project will enhance the student’s learning experience. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (3,2,2)

Engineering (EGR)

  
  • EGR 2413 - Engineering Mechanics I


    Credit(s): 3

    A lecture course covering the equilibrium of point objects and extended objects in two and three dimensions using vector algebra. Also discussed are distributed forces, structures, friction, and moments of inertia in two and three dimensions. Prerequisite: C or Higher in both MAT 1623  and PHY 2514 . (3,3,0)
  
  • EGR 2433 - Engineering Mechanics II


    Credit(s): 3

    A lecture course that covers kinematics of particles and rigid bodies, kinetics of particles and rigid bodies using force-mass acceleration, energy, and momentum methods. Prerequisites: EGR 2413  and credit or enrollment in MAT 2613 , Calculus III. (3,3,0)

Electrical Technology (ELT)

  
  • ELT 1113 - Residential Wiring


    Credit(s): 3

    Advanced skills related to the wiring of single and multifamily buildings. Includes instruction and practice in service-entrance installation, National Electrical Code ® requirements, and specialized circuits. Prerequisite:  ELT 1123  (3,2,2)
  
  • ELT 1123 - Commercial Wiring


    Credit(s): 3

    Instruction and practice in the installation of commercial electrical services including the types of conduit and other raceways, National Electrical Code ® requirements, and three-phase distribution networks. Prerequisites:  ELT 1233 . (3,2,2)
  
  • ELT 1133 - Applications of the National Electrical Code


    Credit(s): 3

    The course is designed to place emphasis on developing the student’s ability to locate, interpret and properly apply information in the National Electrical Code in real-world applications. (3,2,2)
  
  • ELT 1143 - AC and DC Circuits for Electrical Technology


    Credit(s): 3

    Principles and theories associated with AC and DC circuits used in the electrical trades. Includes the study of electrical circuits, laws, and formulas, and the use of test equipment to analyze AC and DC circuits. (3,1,4).
  
  • ELT 1183 - Industrial Wiring


    Credit(s): 3

    This course includes instruction and practice in the installation of industrial electrical services including the types of conduit and other raceways, National Electrical Code ® requirements, and three-phase distribution networks. Prerequisite: ELT 1113  (3,2,2)

     

  
  • ELT 1213 - Electrical Power


    Credit(s): 3

    Electrical motors and their installation. Instruction and practice in using the different types of electrical motors, transformers, and alternators. Prerequisite: ELT 1143 . (3,2,2)
  
  • ELT 1223 - Motor Maintenance and Troubleshooting


    Credit(s): 3

    Principles and practice of electrical motor repair includes topics on the disassembly/assembly and preventive maintenance of common electrical motors are discussed. (3,2,2)
  
  • ELT 1233 - Fundamentals of Electricity, Construction, and Manufacturing


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental skills associated with all electrical courses. Safety, basic tools, special tools, equipment, and an introduction to simple AC and DC circuits will be included. (3,2,2)
  
  • ELT 1253 - Branch Circuit and Service Entrance Calculations


    Credit(s): 3

    The course is designed to teach students the calculations of circuit sizes for all branch circuits and service entrances in all electrical installation. Proper use of the National Electrical Code ® will be required. Prerequsite: ELT 1213 . (3,2,2)
  
  • ELT 1263 - Electrical Drawings and Schematics


    Credit(s): 3

    This course introduces architectural, industrial, mechanical, and electrical symbols needed to read blueprints, schematic diagrams. Prints and drawings associated with electrical wiring will be studied. Prerequisite: ELT 1253 . (3,2,2)
  
  • ELT 1273 - Switching Circuits for Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Applications


    Credit(s): 3

    Introduction to various methods by which switches and control devices are installed. It includes installation and operation of residential/commercial automation systems. (3,2,2)
  
  • ELT 1283 - Cost Estimation for Electrical Installation


    Credit(s): 3

    This course gives students the knowledge and ability to estimate the cost of an electrical installation using specifications for various structures. (3,2,2)
  
  • ELT 1363 - Industrial Hydraulics for Electrical Technology


    Credit(s): 3

    This course introduces the students to basic hydraulics, hydraulic actuators, accumulators valves, pumps, motors, fluids, coolers, and filters.  Emphasis is placed on development of hydraulic control circuits, electrical interfacing techniques and troubleshooting. (3,2,2)
  
  • ELT 1373 - Industrial Pneumatics for Electrical Technology


    Credit(s): 3

    This course introduces the students to basic pneumatic principles, compression of air, work devices, control devices, and circuit diagrams.  Emphasis is placed on development of pneumatic control circuits, electromechanical control of fluid power, and troubleshooting techniques. (3,2,2)
  
  • ELT 1413 - Motor Control Systems


    Credit(s): 3

    This course includes the installation of different motor control circuits and devices. Emphasis is placed on developing the student’s ability to diagram, wire, and troubleshoot the different circuits and mechanical control devices. Prerequisite:  ELT 1263 . (3,2,2)
  
  • ELT 1563 - Low Voltage and Special Systems for Electrical Technology


    Credit(s): 3

    This course provides information and hands-on experience in installation, operation, troubleshooting, and repair of residential- and commercial-use low voltage and communication systems, including analog and digital key systems. (3,2,2)
  
  • ELT 2113 - Equipment Maintenance, Troubleshooting, and Repair


    Credit(s): 3

    Maintenance and troubleshooting techniques, use of technical manuals and test equipment, and inspection/evaluation/repair of equipment. (3,2,2)
  
  • ELT 2423 - Solid State Motor Control


    Credit(s): 3

    Principles and operation of solid-state motor control, and variable frequency drives. The design, installation, and maintenance of different solid-state devices for motor control will be introduced. Prerequisite: ELT 2113 . (3,1,4)
  
  • ELT 2613 - Programmable Logic Controllers


    Credit(s): 3

    This course provides instruction in the use of programmable logic controllers (PLCs) in modern industrial settings. The operating principles, installation and basic programming of PLCs will be covered. Prerequisite: ELT 2423 . (3,2,2)
  
  • ELT 2623 - Advanced Programmable Logic Controllers


    Credit(s): 3

    This is an advanced PLC course that provides instruction in the various operations and installations of advanced electrical control systems. Information in areas such as sequencer, program control, introduction to function blocks, sequential function chart, introduction to HMI, and logical and conversion instructions will be included. Prerequisites: ELT 2613 - Programmable Logic Controllers  and ELT 1413 - Motor Control Systems . (3,2,2)

Emergency Medical and Paramedic (EMS)

*The Prerequisite for all advanced-level EMS courses identified by an * is the successful completion of EMS 1117 . Further, all first semester EMS-prefaced courses are prerequisite for second semester courses, and all second semester courses are prerequisite for third semester courses.

  
  • EMS 1117 - Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)


    Credit(s): 7

    This course includes responsibilities of the EMT during each phase of an ambulance run, patient assessment, emergency medical conditions, appropriate emergency care, and appropriate procedures form transporting patient. (7,4,4,3)
  
  • EMS 1133 - Foundations of Paramedicine


    Credit(s): 3

    This course consists of a comprehensive review of the knowledge base and skill set of the Emergency Medical Technician.  History of EMS, Well-Being of the EMT, medical legal issues, communication and documentation will be expanded to the role of the paramedic.  This course includes the theory related to intravenous/intraosseous access, medication administration, patient assessment, and introductory pharmacological calculations.  It also includes a laboratory experience designed to give psychomotor experience to the theoretical concepts developed in the lecture.  (3, 2, 2)
  
  • EMS 1213 - Concepts of Airway and Respiratory Medicine


    Credit(s): 3

    This course integrates complex knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology into the assessment to develop and implement a treatment plan with the goal of assuring a patient airway, adequate mechanical ventilation, and respiration for patients of all ages.  This course also includes a lab that will integrate comprehensive knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology into the assessment to develop and implement a treatment plan with the goal of ensuring a patent airway, adequate mechanical ventilation, and respirations for patients of all ages.  (3, 2, 2)
  
  • EMS 1325 - Concepts of Cardiovascular Medicine


    Credit(s): 5

    This course consists of the theory, anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology and treatments associated with the conditions of the cardiovascular system. This includes the theory of introductory, advanced, and multi-lead electrocardiogram interpretation.  Changes in the lifespan will also be included.  It is also a laboratory experience designed to give psychomotor experience to the theoretical concepts developed in the lecture.  (5, 3, 4)
  
  • EMS 1514 - Practicum I


    Credit(s): 4

    Using supervised rotations in a definitive care setting, the students will apply the concepts developed in the didactic and laboratory courses to live patients. This will include, but not be limited to rotations in the emergency department, ICU, OR, respiratory therapy, and pediatrics.  (4,0,12 clinical)
  
  • EMS 1525 - Practicum II


    Credit(s): 5

    A continuation of EMS 1514.  Using supervised rotations in a definitive care setting, the students will continue to develop assessment and treatment skills.  The student will transition to field experience upon achieving competencies in the definitive care setting.  Prerequisite: EMS 1514  (5,9 clinical,6 field) .
  
  • EMS 1713 - Concepts of Neurological Medicine


    Credit(s): 3

    This course consists of the theory, anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, and treatments associated with conditions of the nervous system.  This includes conditions related to structure and those associated with organic and non- organic brain disease.  Changes in the lifespan will be included.  It is also a laboratory experience designed to give psychomotor experience to the theoretical concepts developed in the lecture. (3, 2, 2)
  
  • EMS 1913 - Concepts of Reproductive Medicine


    Credit(s): 3

    This course consists of the theory, anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, and treatments associated with conditions of the reproductive system.  The course includes care of the newborn as part of the concepts in reproductive medicine.  Changes in the lifespan will be included.  It is also a laboratory experience designed to give psychomotor experience to the theoretical concepts developed in the lecture.  (3, 2, 2)
  
  • EMS 2211 - Fundamentals of Advanced EMT Practicum


    Credit(s): 1

    Using supervised rotations in a definitive care setting, the student will apply the concepts developed in the didactic course to live patients in the out of hospital setting. (1,0,0,3)
  
  • EMS 2312 - Fundamentals of Advanced EMT Lecture


    Credit(s): 2

    This course is required to apply for certification as an Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT). This course introduces the theory and application of concepts related to the profession of the AEMT. The primary focus of the AEMT is to provide basic and limited advanced emergency medical care and transportation for critical and emergent patients across the lifespan who access the emergency medical system. Topics include extending the knowledge of the EMT to a more complex breadth and depth, Intravenous access and fluid therapy, medication administration, blind insertion airway devices, as well as the advanced assessment and management of various medical illnesses and traumatic injuries. This course is based on the NHTSA National Emergency Medical Services Education Standards. (2,2,0)
  
  • EMS 2314 - Medical Emergencies of the Secondary Assessment


    Credit(s): 4

    This course will integrate patient assessment and assessment findings with principles of epidemiology and pathophysiology across the lifespan.  At the conclusion of this course, the student will be able to formulate a field impression and implement a comprehensive treatment/disposition plan for a patient with a medical complaint.  (4, 3, 2)
  
  • EMS 2566 - Practicum III


    Credit(s): 6

    Under the supervision of an approved program preceptor, the student will continue to apply the concepts developed in the didactic, laboratory, and clinical settings to the care of patients in the environment of EMS. Prerequisite:  EMS 1525  (6, 9 clinical, 9 field)      
  
  • EMS 2715 - Concepts of Traumatic Medicine


    Credit(s): 5

    This course will develop the basis for the pathophysiology, identification, and treatment of traumatic emergencies including coverage of concepts related to trauma systems and shock management.  These concepts will be examined in patients across the life span.  It also includes the trauma laboratory experience is designed to give psychomotor experience to the theoretical concepts developed in the lecture.  (5, 3, 4)
  
  • EMS 2912 - Concepts of EMS Operations


    Credit(s): 2

    Knowledge of operational roles and responsibilities to ensure safe patient, public, and personnel safety. (2, 2, 0)
  
  • EMS 2934 - Paramedic Capstone


    Credit(s): 4

    This course serves as a capstone experience course at the end of the Paramedic Program.  This course will include the following topics: special needs patient populations, EMS research, principles of public health, integration of leadership, and emerging roles in EMS.  It will also serve as a comprehensive review of the program.  This course will provide the student with a final opportunity to incorporate their cognitive knowledge and psychomotor skills through cumulative practical skill evaluations and a comprehensive Final Examination.  (4, 2, 4)

English (ENG)

  
  • ENG 1033 - Technical English


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is designed specifically for Career Tech students who are pursuing the A.A.S. or A.A.S.O.E. degree. In this course, students will focus on appropriate writing for business and industry and will produce technical documents, which may include resumes, letters, emails, memos/reports, proposals, multimedia presentations, and other related documents.  (3,3,0)
  
  • ENG 1113 - English Composition I


    Credit(s): 3

    This course prepares the student to think critically and compose texts for academic and professional rhetorical situations. Prerequisite: ACT English 17 or higher or Equivalent ACCUPLACER score in writing. (3,3,0)
  
  • ENG 1114 - English Comp I


    Credit(s): 4

    This course prepares the student to think critically and compose texts for academic and professional rhetorical situations. (4,3,2)
  
  • ENG 1123 - English Composition II


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is a continuation of English Composition I with emphasis on research, argumentation, and composition. Readings, essays, and a research paper are required. ENG 1113  is a prerequisite to ENG 1123. (3,3,0)
  
  • ENG 1123H - Honors English Composition II


    Credit(s): 3

    Course builds upon the skills acquired in first semester composition. Special attention is given to critical reading of selections from various literary genres, written analysis based upon the selections, using the library, and documented research writing. Enrollment by invitation. (3,3,0)
  
  • ENG 2133 - Creative Writing I


    Credit(s): 3

    ENG 2133 involves reading and writing poetry, short fiction, and/or other genres. Prerequisite:  ENG 1123H  or ENG 1123 . (3,3,0)
  
  • ENG 2143 - Creative Writing II


    Credit(s): 3

    ENG 2143 involves reading and writing poetry, short fiction, and/or other genres. (3,3,0)
  
  • ENG 2153 - Traditional Grammar


    Credit(s): 3

    This course focuses on the basic elements of English grammar and mechanics. Prerequisite: ENG 1123  or  . (3,3,0)
  
  • ENG 2223 - American Literature I


    Credit(s): 3

    Surveys representative prose and poetry of the United States from its beginnings to the Civil War. Prerequisite:  ENG 1123 . (3,3,0)
  
  • ENG 2233 - American Literature II


    Credit(s): 3

    ENG 2233 surveys representative prose and poetry of the United States from the Civil War to the present. Prerequisite: ENG 1123H  or ENG 1123 . (3,3,0)
  
  • ENG 2323 - British Literature I


    Credit(s): 3

    This course surveys British literature from the Anglo-Saxon Period through the Restoration and Eighteenth Century. Prerequisite:  ENG 1123  or  . (3,3,0)
  
  • ENG 2333 - British Literature II


    Credit(s): 3

    This course surveys British literature from the Romantic Period to present. Prerequisite: ENG 1123H  or ENG 1123 . (3,3,0)
  
  • ENG 2333H - Honors British Literature II


    Credit(s): 3

    ENG 2333  surveys British Literature from the Romantic Period through the Twentieth Century. Prerequisite: ENG 1123H . (3,3,0)
  
  • ENG 2423 - World Literature I


    Credit(s): 3

    This course surveys texts representative of global, historical, and cultural diversity from the ancient world through the early modern world. Prerequisite:   or ENG 1123 . (3,3,0)
  
  • ENG 2423H - Honors World Literature I


    Credit(s): 3

    Designed for students who have a special interest in World Literature and who have at least a “B” average in Freshman Composition. A survey of selected writing of the Ancient World period, Middle ages, and the Renaissance. (Enrollment through invitation.) Prerequisite: ENG 1123  or ENG 1123H. (3,3,0)
  
  • ENG 2433 - World Literature II


    Credit(s): 3

    This course surveys texts representative of global, historical, and cultural diversity from the Enlightenment Period to the present. Prerequisite:   or ENG 1123 . (3,3,0)
  
  • ENG 2513 - African-American Literature


    Credit(s): 3

    ENG 2513 surveys literature of major African American writers from its beginnings to the present. Prerequisite: ENG 1113  and ENG 1123 . (3,3,0)
  
  • ENG 2613 - Film as Literature


    Credit(s): 3

    Film as Literature. A study of current and classic motion pictures as a form of literary, historic, and cinematic expression with an emphasis on American culture. Prerequisite: ENG 1113  or ENG 1114 . (3,3,0)

Educational Psychology (EPY)

  
  • EPY 2513 - Child Psychology


    Credit(s): 3

    A study of various aspects of human growth and development during childhood and emerging adolescence. Topics include biological, psychosocial and cognitive development. Prerequisite: PSY 1513 . (3,3,0)
  
  • EPY 2533 - Human Growth and Development


    Credit(s): 3

    A study of various aspects of human growth and development from conception through death. Topics include biological, psychosocial and cognitive development. Prerequisites: PSY 1513 . (3,3,0)

Family and Consumer Studies (FCS)

  
  • FCS 1253 - Nutrition


    Credit(s): 3

    A lecture course covering the nutrients for normal growth and prevention of major chronic diseases, and applied to the selection of food for ingestion, the metabolic process of digestion, assimilation and absorption, and the applications for healthcare providers. Prerequisite: BIO 1134 , BIO 2514 , and BIO 2524  recommended. (3,3,0)

Fire Protection Technology (FFT)

  
  • FFT 1213 - Firefighting Principles and Practices


    Credit(s): 3

    A basic firefighting tactical course, this class provides information about the major principles and practices conducted at fire and emergency scenes. Concentrating on activities of rescue, ventilation, salvage, overhaul, offensive and defensive attack methods, and firefighter safety, students explore various operations that must be conducted in a coordinated manner. (3,2,2)

Family Services Practicum (FSP)

  
  • FSP 2113 - Family Services Practicum I


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is designed for Family Services Navigation majors as a pre-professional field experience broadening the student’s public knowledge and expanding the experiences associated with personal and family services to enhance the theoretical content learned throughout the coursework. It is expected that the field experience will afford students the opportunity to interact and collaborate with personal and family services professionals and organizations with similar missions. Integral to closing the loop on the learning process is the opportunity for students to reflect on the field experience. Students will collaborate on the different infrastructures and approaches they observed at each field location. Consent of the Personal/Family Navigator program director required. Eight hours clinic per week. Pre/corequisites: Admission into a PHT/Navigator Concentration. PHT courses must be taken in curriculum display  (3,0,9)

     

  
  • FSP 2223 - Family Services Practicum II


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is designed for Family Services Navigation majors as a pre-professional field experience broadening the student’s public knowledge and expanding the experiences associated with personal and family services to enhance the theoretical content learned throughout the coursework. It is expected that field experience II will continue to afford students the opportunity to interact and collaborate with personal and family services professionals and organizations with similar missions. Integral to closing the loop on the learning process is the opportunity for students to reflect on the field experience. Students will collaborate on the different infrastructures and approaches they observed at each field location. Consent of the Personal/Family Navigator program director required. Eight hours clinic per week. Pre/corequisites: Admission into a PHT/Navigator Concentration. PHT courses must be taken in curriculum display.  (3,0,9)

     


Geometric Dimensioning (GDT)

  
  • GDT 1625 - Fundamentals of Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing


    Credit(s): 5

    This course is designed to provide students with a solid foundation in the fundamentals of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing. Includes emphasis on measurement theory, common terms and definitions, profile tolerances, orientation tolerances, locational tolerances, runout tolerances, and form tolerances as they relate to Machine Tool Technology. (5,3,4)

Geography (GEO)

  
  • GEO 1113 - World Regional Geography


    Credit(s): 3

    A regional survey of the basic geographic features and major new developments of the nations of the world. (3,3,0)

Gaming Management Technology (GMT)

  
  • GMT 1113 - Casino Business Strategy & Operations


    Credit(s): 3

    Fundamentals of the strategic business processes of a casino organization from internal and external perspectives. This course will examine current gaming trends as well as evaluate anti-gaming campaigns and their possible cost. Topics include casino economics, environmental factors including social, political, legal and competitive forces, consumer behaviors, and development of a corporate culture, internal controls, and future of the gaming industry. (3,3,0)
  
  • GMT 1123 - Casino Customer Service


    Credit(s): 3

    Fundamentals of the theory, practice, and management of guest service and how it impacts the success of a casino organization with an emphasis on service strategies, staffing issues and service systems. Topics include the dynamics of guest satisfaction, service quality, value, planning and analysis, the service environment, training and motivation, establishment of a total service culture, guest co-production, communications, service failure recovery techniques, delivery systems and measurement of service results. (3,3,0)

     

  
  • GMT 1133 - Casino Financial Accounting


    Credit(s): 3

    Foundation course in the accounting processes applicable to the hotel, resort, or casino environment. Students will be introduced to the generally accepted accounting principles and legal requirements of financial reporting in the hospitality and casino industries. (3,3,0)
  
  • GMT 1143 - Casino & Resort Marketing


    Credit(s): 3

    An in-depth overview of the application of marketing concepts within the casino/resort industry. Focus on marketing issues unique to the gaming industry with special attention to application of market segmentation, product differentiation and positioning, and promotion. Topics include casino promotions, database marketing techniques, discounting, casino hosting, credit procedures, marketing policies and procedures, amenities, and the casino marketing plan. (3,3,0)
  
  • GMT 1153 - Casino & Resort Management


    Credit(s): 3

    This course will provide an overview of the history, development and operations of casinos and casino/resorts. Topics include economics of the casino, its interface with the hotel, organizations, and terminology. (3,3,0)
  
  • GMT 1163 - Introduction to Surveillance Operations


    Credit(s): 3

    This course will discuss the types of surveillance and security that is required in gaming operations. An overview of crowd control, terrorist threats, and other major incident responses will be covered. The course will discuss employee security measures. (3,3,0)
 

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